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2018年04月19日
Plan a wedding, save a farm
Despite conservation efforts and a resurgence in local farming, New England is still losing about 100 agricultural acres to development every day. For many small farms, family estates, orchards, and other largely undeveloped properties, the cost of taxes and maintenance alone can make keeping their land too expensive. Sam McElhinney MBA '17, born and raised in Massachusetts and an avid lover of the outdoors, always wanted to find a way to conserve the open lands he so loved. It wasn’t until McElhinney, who was on the lumberjack team and president of the fishing club at Dartmouth College, reached his late 20s and he and many of his friends began planning their own weddings that the idea hit him.

“Traditional, professional event venues are built to more or less mass produce events,” says McElhinney. “I was away one weekend with friends at a farm and they were all talking about how generic weddings felt at these commercial event venues and I said why not just get married somewhere like this and create the entire thing to be the way you want?”

Some couples do get married on a farm owned by a family member or friend — but unless you know someone willing to do this as a one-time favor, getting a stranger to transform an old estate into a wedding venue poses many problems. McElhinney saw the opportunity in solving those problems: If he figured out the logistics, he could give small farms a low-time impact but high-value solution to getting the money they need all while giving couples a unique, customizable space for their wedding. McElhinney started Mayflower Venues, which touts an automated, intelligent technology system that enables these non-traditional spaces to use modern systems and tools to host a small number of weddings a year.

“A number of the venues on our website had couples pulling up their driveway knocking on their barn door asking if they could have a wedding in their yard,” says McElhinney. “They always turned them away because they had no idea how to figure out insurance, what price to charge, how to tell them what caterers would need. With a full-time job as a farmer, they couldn’t handle it.” So, Mayflower Venues is doing all that work for them.

Since officially launching the company last fall, McElhinney and his team — and the platform — have hosted one event, gotten more than 40 venues on board, and booked dozens of events for 2018 and 2019. Mayflower’s role, says McElhinney, really becomes that of the venue coordinator. “We identify these spaces and digitize them. We built this entire proprietary onboarding app by working with a variety of expert wedding planners, caterers, and vendors to figure out what are the inputs couples will need and we collect all that info and create a comprehensive set of wedding planning tools specific to each venue’s eccentricities. We know how many feet of hose a caterer would need to reach the potable water spout at a historic family estate, for example, and the platform presents that information to the couple and their vendor at the right time.”

McElhinney is focused on the unique, sustainable nature of the properties. “We only allow one wedding a weekend at each venue. We don’t want a wedding factory, we don’t want three weddings going into a small town in the Berkshires in 72 hours; but we do want one wedding going into a small town in the Berkshires because that’s great revenue, for catering and accommodations. We’re really excited about bringing this millennial revenue into rural America and that is a very sustainable action.”Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/prom-dress-uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/short-prom-dresses-uk
[ 投稿者:makayla at 17:06 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

2018年03月31日
This Is How Miley Cyrus Does Easter
You can always count on Miley Cyrus to do things her way—even when it comes to Easter. While the rest of us will be busy breaking out the Paas egg kits or stockpiling Cadbury chocolates, the pop star has something glitzier planned. “[I’m] going to a drag show . . . duh!” Cyrus told us via e-mail from Los Angeles. But enjoying a drag revue isn’t the only thing Cyrus has in store for the weekend. By celebrating the event with a special series of images by photographer Vijat Mohindra, she is continuing a tradition begun earlier this year in which every holiday is marked by a new photographic statement, a kind of social media calendar. “It started with Valentine’s Day on a shoot with Ellen von Unwerth, went into St. Paddy’s Day partying with some friends, and now it’s Easter,” said Cyrus. “I’m excited that Vogue wants to get involved and celebrate with me!”

With shots of Cyrus posing in pastels, holding glittery carrots, and, yes, getting spanked by the Easter Bunny, the end result is a tongue-in-cheek exploration of a holiday that can skew formal. Playful with a pinup vibe and dreamy colors, the shoot aligns perfectly with Cyrus’s personal look. That makes sense considering she styled it herself with help from designer Bradley Kenneth McPeek, whose innovative eyewear features within. For Cyrus, who has undergone multiple fashion evolutions during her time in the spotlight, sartorial experimentation comes with the territory. “If everything is cute . . . it works together, so pile it on and wear all your favorites at once! No such thang as too much!” she said. With the Met Gala on her schedule, there’s a chance that she’ll apply that same philosophy to her ensemble, but for the moment, Cyrus is most excited about attending the event with Stella McCartney, a designer whose commitment to animal welfare matches her own. “I am vegan and I live a vegan lifestyle. I am animal-product free and honored to represent a sustainable brand,” she proclaimed.

Though the carefree calendar is almost certain to delight fans, whimsical photo shoots only represent one side of what Cyrus has been up to lately. She was among the performers on hand in Washington, D.C., for the student-led anti-gun demonstration March for Our Lives, where she delivered a stirring performance of “The Climb.” “I was so inspired by the youth of [Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School] and proud to be a part of such an incredible moment/movement,” said Cyrus, who considers the day one she’ll never forget. “It was amazing to watch these young people speak and perform. Hopefully, we will begin to see the change and watch these incredible students have an enormous impact on the government and gun laws.” Cyrus said she will continue to support the causes she believes in, including through her nonprofit, the Happy Hippie Foundation. “I’ve got a microphone,” she said, “and I’m not afraid to use it!”Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/evening-dresses-uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/prom-dresses-shop-in-liverpool-uk
[ 投稿者:makayla at 16:42 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

2018年03月26日
Can suntan give you skin cancer?
Excessive exposure to the ultraviolet rays of the sun increases one’s risk of suffering from skin cancer. While it might not be a prevalent one like the other cancers but given the pollution levels in the atmosphere, even the potent rays of the sun are able to penetrate through our skin these days. This makes our skin more vulnerable to skin cancer. Skin cancer is the abnormal growth of skin cells often developed in parts most exposed to the sun. It develops primarily in areas including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on legs. Here is everything you need to know about skin cancer.

Other than protecting the complexion from the harsh rays of the sun, another season is to protect it from falling prey to dermal cancer. This is why experts advise against getting tanned due to overexposure to the sun. Here Dr Apratim Goel dermatologist and laser surgeon Director, Cutis skin studio, Mumbai tells us why getting a tan might not be good for anyone.

‘During summer time depending on which part of the world you’re from, you may prepare to chill on the beach and get that much-awaited tan or run indoors to prevent yourself from looking darker. Though Indians are not great fans of getting tanned, we do indulge in summer activities on the beach or just the travelling in the scorching sun may give you an unwanted tan. Here are few natural remedies for sun tanned skin.

‘First of all, a tan for anyone is not a good idea. If you have Fitzpatrick skin type I or II (white skin) you are at a higher risk of developing skin cancer. You may want a bronze look, but it’s actually your melanin multiplying to protect you from DNA mutations from sun damage, this multiplication of melanin if goes haywire can eventually lead to skin cancer.

‘Sunburn is one of the most obvious signs of UV exposure and skin damage. After a few days, you see redness and peeling. Sunburn is a form of short-term skin damage but can get very uncomfortable with anything touching the skin, even keeping clothes on become difficult. Studies have shown some relation between extreme sunburn and melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

‘If you’re Fitzpatrick skin type III, IV, V (brown to black), you may be at a lesser risk for skin cancer, but there are some more effects of suntan which occur in all skin types – premature ageing – tanning causes more premature ageing, more wrinkles and blotchy sunspots. The more you tan, the worse your skin looks. No wonder we dermatologists keep advising sunscreen all the time!’

Bottom line there is no such thing as a safe tan!

‘Take adequate sun protection by taking oral sunscreen, apply ‘broadspectrum’ sunscreen, wear a wide-brimmed hat, wear glares to protect your eyes (photokeratitis – like sunburn of the cornea), cover your skin when you’re outdoors,’ she says.Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/backless-evening-dresses | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/sexy-evening-dresses
[ 投稿者:makayla at 19:20 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

2018年03月12日
Shabana Azmi criticises Oscar’s red carpet culture
Veteran actor and activist Shabana Azmi is amazed to see the desperation to conform to set beauty standards at the Oscars red carpet, and called it a huge pity. “Watching Oscar Red Carpet and I am struck by the desperation to conform to set standards of beauty,” Shabana tweeted on Sunday.

“Nicked tucked bosom out, b**t strutted. Such pressure to not accept yourself as you are. What a huge pity,” she added.

The actor, who has always been vocal about censuring the beauty and fashion standards set by international film festivals and award galas, did not mention which edition of Oscars she was watching. For many, the Oscars not only stands for celebrating the best of Hollywood, but also for setting fashion goals and beauty trends. The 90th Academy Awards ceremony was held on March 4 in Los Angeles.

Shabana had earlier told IANS, “What bothers me about red carpet particularly Cannes is that it’s an extremely important festival where stunning films are shown and nothing of that ever comes in papers. It’s always celebrities standing with one hand on waist, I don’t know who decided that as an attractive position.”

On the work front, she is busy taking her play Kaifi Aur Main to international shores. “Thank you Sydney for the standing ovation and for being such an appreciate audience for Kaifi Aur Main last night. Looking forward to the show in Auckland on March 11,” she posted on Friday.Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/long-evening-dresses-uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/purple-prom-dresses-uk
[ 投稿者:makayla at 17:14 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

2018年02月28日
Rita Ora’s secret fashion collection
LOS ANGELES-Rita Ora reveals she has been working ‘secretly’ on a new merchandise line ahead of her upcoming tour.

Rita Ora is launching a brand new range of merchandise.

The 27-year-old singer is about to embark on a new tour and has revealed that she has been working on a ‘’secret’’ collection exclusively for her fans which they can but when they come and see her perform. Speaking about her creation, she said: ‘’I have been working secretly on this for a while with my team. I am so passionate about fashion so it’s such a pleasure and honour for me to be able to express that through my very own collection. It is meant to inspire you to be your best self, your own hero!’’ The clothing and accessories collection will be called ‘ROARA REPUBLIC’- a play on her own name - and will feature crewneck sweaters, hoodies, t-shirts and hats in a range of gender neutral designs that will be available to buy on her website from March 3. The ‘Anywhere’ singer was inspired by her London roots and incorporated the city’s rich and diverse legacy as well as 90s street aesthetic for her nostalgic clothing range designs. Rita is not new to the fashion market, having previously spent three years designing for athleisure brand Adidas Originals, where she came up with 15 collections that were worn by the likes of Gigi Hadid and Beyonce. After a performance of her latest ‘Fifty shades’ single ‘For you’ at the Brit’s, the singer jetted off to Milan Fashion Week where she walked the red carpet at the Prada show.

She took to her Instagram story to post images of her pre-show beauty regime which took place on the beauty’s private jet. She said: ‘’Doing eye liner on the place isn’t easy! See you soon at prada.’’

In one picture, the star was seen lounging in her underwear as a team of make-up artists and stylists rallied around to help her get glammed and she captioned it: ‘’Glam on a plane straight to a fashion show.”Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/short-prom-dresses-uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/vintage-prom-dress
[ 投稿者:makayla at 16:48 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

2018年01月20日
Three Shows That Stood out at Milan Fashion Week Men's
Milan Fashion Week Men's delivered a series of strong collections across the board that utilised environment, aesthetic, and sound as far and beyond as the collections themselves.

Reuben Selby took to Milan and provided us with a roundup of three of the biggest standout shows of the week.

Marcelo Burlon's AW18 show placed BMX culture at its core, setting the stage for a cast of inked misfits.

Models sports parkas, zip-up jackets, trucker jackets, sweats, racing pants, and cropped bombers. Gothic elements ran across the shows looks, with a range of motifs from coloured checks to medieval calligraphy and repeated nocturnal hues.

Branding was stripped back in comparison to past collections, yet collaborations with the NBA, MLB, and Timberland provided a strong contrast through heavy signage.

Marcelo was seen manning the DJ booth whilst a BMX rider freestyled throughout the show, creating a cinematic atmosphere that reflected the youthful, unified lifestyle presented by County of Milan.

Giuliano Calza immerses GCDS in sparks of fairy tale magic for the Men's and Women's FW18/19 collections. The result is a cathartic and initiatory journey of streetwear that mirrors the archetypal fairytale.

The show consisted of three acts: background, drama, and a happy ending, each with its own aesthetic and sound. GCDS explored fashion as a territory of freedom in which the individual can stage their own story.

Music, themes and iconographic references have been conceived and executed in collaboration with Disney, an ideal and indispensable partner for thinking about the collection and its show.

Diesel Black Gold provided a trip around the world for their FW18 season, delivering an eclectic, forward-thinking wardrobe.

The overall silhouette is one of Bohemian influence, with the brand's signature contemporary codes being updated with a multi-ethnic filter. There is a focus on tactile textured across the collection, with staple pieces from leather jackets to denim pants being decorated with Navajo carpet patterns and a range of hardware detailing.

A range of diverse, ethnic influence is seen throughout, with fabrication and print providing a range of interchangeable stylings.

Trible reference further informs accessory choices from laced-up shoes, stitched leather and multi-stud design bags.Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/long-evening-dresses-uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/plus-size-prom-dresses
[ 投稿者:makayla at 15:36 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

Three Shows That Stood out at Milan Fashion Week Men's
Milan Fashion Week Men's delivered a series of strong collections across the board that utilised environment, aesthetic, and sound as far and beyond as the collections themselves.

Reuben Selby took to Milan and provided us with a roundup of three of the biggest standout shows of the week.

Marcelo Burlon's AW18 show placed BMX culture at its core, setting the stage for a cast of inked misfits.

Models sports parkas, zip-up jackets, trucker jackets, sweats, racing pants, and cropped bombers. Gothic elements ran across the shows looks, with a range of motifs from coloured checks to medieval calligraphy and repeated nocturnal hues.

Branding was stripped back in comparison to past collections, yet collaborations with the NBA, MLB, and Timberland provided a strong contrast through heavy signage.

Marcelo was seen manning the DJ booth whilst a BMX rider freestyled throughout the show, creating a cinematic atmosphere that reflected the youthful, unified lifestyle presented by County of Milan.

Giuliano Calza immerses GCDS in sparks of fairy tale magic for the Men's and Women's FW18/19 collections. The result is a cathartic and initiatory journey of streetwear that mirrors the archetypal fairytale.

The show consisted of three acts: background, drama, and a happy ending, each with its own aesthetic and sound. GCDS explored fashion as a territory of freedom in which the individual can stage their own story.

Music, themes and iconographic references have been conceived and executed in collaboration with Disney, an ideal and indispensable partner for thinking about the collection and its show.

Diesel Black Gold provided a trip around the world for their FW18 season, delivering an eclectic, forward-thinking wardrobe.

The overall silhouette is one of Bohemian influence, with the brand's signature contemporary codes being updated with a multi-ethnic filter. There is a focus on tactile textured across the collection, with staple pieces from leather jackets to denim pants being decorated with Navajo carpet patterns and a range of hardware detailing.

A range of diverse, ethnic influence is seen throughout, with fabrication and print providing a range of interchangeable stylings.

Trible reference further informs accessory choices from laced-up shoes, stitched leather and multi-stud design bags.Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/long-evening-dresses-uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/plus-size-prom-dresses
[ 投稿者:makayla at 15:14 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

2018年01月10日
Rising star menswear designer Craig Green on fame, family and fantastic fabrics
Backstage, on the last day of London Fashion Week Men’s, Green — who confessed he hadn’t slept last night — talked about technique and inspiration for this latest offering that also featured simpler pieces like white shirts, sweatshirts, jeans and a black derby shoe that is a collaboration with Grenson.

“It’s like you’re seeing something in a photo but you don’t know what the clothes are made from,” said Green of the starting point for this collection.

He also spoke about using an old construction technique to create military gig seams and pleats. Though perhaps the best description was his explanation for using the Latex: “It was like you’d taken your mum’s old curtains and tried to make them into a jet ski.”

Just before Christmas, at a café off Piccadilly, I spent an hour talking to Green.

Topics ranged from his embarrassment of liking Abba to zombies, what kind of man wears a thong (conclusion: hopefully none), and a drunken encounter meeting his teen idol Marilyn Manson, one of an increasing number of celebrities who choose to wear Green’s designs (others include Drake and FKA Twigs). He also admits he still finds seeing his clothes worn by people in the street — which I’ve clocked with notable frequency in London of late — as “weird.”

Green, born in Hendon where he still lives one street from his mum, established his label in 2012, which makes his position as one of the most highly regarded talents in menswear impressive. His clothes have hung in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, appeared on Michael Fassbender on the silver screen in Ridley Scott’s Alien Covenant, and have graced the backs of Wayne McGregor’s dancers in a ballet at the Royal Opera House.

Just last month he won British menswear designer of the year at the British Fashion Awards for the second time in a row. He was shocked to win again but concedes this kind of recognition has changed how people see the brand.

In the past critics have referred to his London runway shows as emotional experiences — spring/summer 2015 moved the front row to tears.

“It’s never intentional to make an emotional show, but everyone works on it so intensely. The idea is always a feeling, a concept,” he says before quickly adding “without sounding too arty”. Building on this critical acclaim, Green is taking important steps towards the label’s future.

Having worked in one room for years, he has moved the team into a new space near London City airport. “We’d just run out of room, there were fabrics in the toilets!” He now has his own office, while the team has grown from three to nine. “The team you have around you is the most important thing because this is not a one-man band,” he says in typically humble fashion.

Here’s the thing about Craig Green. He’s somehow managed to create men’s clothes that are both masculine and sensitive, highbrow and wearable, minimalist but joyful. It’s a recipe that seems thoroughly instinctive and natural. His label has the notion of uniform at its heart — and his most recognisable piece is his worker jacket. “Uniforms you do things in,” he calls it. “Not uniforms for status, uniforms for function. There is something romantic about that way of thinking.”

This season will see the launch of the second Craig Green Core collection, a range of clothing launched ahead of the catwalk shows with 12 continuative styles in different fabrics and colours and 11 new designs. It’s a clever way of building on his signatures — such as his popular quilted jacket — while also allowing the catwalk collections pure creative freedom. Notably, 75 per cent of sales now come from this range.

For Core he says if the team can’t think of three people they know who would wear each garment, it doesn’t make the cut. The idea was there would be two different design processes, but the collections have started to blur. A case in point is Japanese denim, designed for Core but which ended up in the spring/summer 2018 show. Available in black, raw indigo and a bleached finish the jeans and jackets feature orange stitching, hand-worked flat-fell seams and one of Green’s signature motifs: a punched circular hole.

“We liked the idea of a badge but we’re not a brand that does logos or names. The hole or circle is something we constantly come back to,” he explains. “It describes everything the brand’s about; a circle of people, spiritual like the sun — it’s like eternity, it’s protective.” He pauses. “I like that it’s a bit sexy too, like a spy hole,” he grins.

In fact, with the jeans you can see the wearer’s boxer shorts beneath. But how would he persuade someone to buy a pair? After looking mildly mortified at the notion of anything resembling a hard sell he offers: “Oh they’re very good. They show your underwear.” And he’s not wrong on either count, obviously.Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/green-prom-dress | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/pink-prom-dresses-uk
[ 投稿者:makayla at 15:27 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]

2018年01月03日
Inside the world of photographer Mary Hilliard
I was always sort of aware of Mary Hilliard. I would see her name next to photographs of people with boldfaced names in Women’s Wear Daily and other publications that I would pore over as a student at Parsons School of Design and, later, as a young designer on Seventh Avenue.

At the few truly fancy New York events that I did manage to worm my way into, I would notice her quietly doing her job, either just inside the entrance, taking pictures of the arriving swells (never me) or gently weaving her way through the crowd until she discovered something worthy of her film and flash.

It wasn’t until more than a decade later that I really got to know Hilliard, when we worked together at a Palm Beach wedding that I helped plan. I was smitten, not only by her easygoing warmth, but by her talent.

Only later, when I inquired about using one of her photographs for the cover of a book I had written, did I realize that so many iconic images that I recognized over the years were hers.

She attended one of my book signings at the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, a terrific organization whose mission is to preserve Palm Beach’s architectural and cultural heritage. The book was a success, in part due to the cover photo, and when she came over to hug me I said, “Someone needs to do a book on you, or at least a retrospective. You’ve photographed some of the most famous people and spectacular events in the world!”

“Oh, come on,” she answered. “No one would be interested in that.”

Thankfully, someone was. It was Hilliard who needed further convincing. Suffice it to say that after some significant nagging, she relented, so long as I would help sort through the photos and curate the exhibit.

Going through her photos was like going through yearbooks, but rather than high school, it was high society.

The end result: “Places & Faces: The Photography of Mary Hilliard” will open at the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach on Jan. 8.

“Fashion and philanthropy have long played a role in the social history of Palm Beach,” says Amanda Skier, executive director of the Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach. “Mary’s work beautifully documents the lives of those who are at the forefront of that culture.”

Though she is often compared to other iconic chroniclers of society such as Slim Aarons and Bill Cunningham, Hilliard will flatly dismiss any such association with her trademark mix of southern charm and genuine modesty. Of Cunningham, she says: “While we all were primarily sent to capture lifestyle and celebrity, Bill was a journalist first, photographer second, and brilliant at both.” He was also a dear friend of hers.

And Aarons? “Slim’s shots were carefully composed. I have always worked more spontaneously, except for maybe a wedding, where you do have to set things up.”

To call Hilliard a wedding photographer would be like calling Coco Chanel a dressmaker. Over a career spanning four decades, she has documented some of the most famous people and extraordinary events imaginable, from Malcolm Forbes’ 70th birthday extravaganza in Morocco to the celebrity circus that is the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Costume Institute Gala.

In between, she began working the mosh pit at runway shows as well as scores of lavish events that were born out of 1980s “Nouvelle Society” and continue to this day.

And while Hilliard maintains that she has never been more than the visual equivalent of a hired hack, her subjects would disagree. Indeed, whenever her name is mentioned, words like “discreet,” “trusted” and “flattering” get repeated over and over again.

Even those who typically avoided the camera rarely said no to her. “I don’t take grotesque pictures,” she said, in a rare profile written about her several years ago.

Rarer still has been access to her archive, which she keeps in the same modest Upper East Side apartment that has been her home for many years. In the 1970s, finding herself a divorced mother with two teenage sons, she matter-of-factly explains, “I needed to work — for me — and also to pay the rent.”

She knew that she had a knack for photography, so she bought a Nikkormat camera and took classes at the Camera Club of New York. Her first published photograph was one of her son’s school field trips to the Little Red Lighthouse under the George Washington Bridge. It is “Item #1” in a collection that now holds more than 100,000 images.

Hilliard’s breakout moment occurred when a friend asked her to shoot a Giorgio Sant’Angelo runway show. The results were so good that they led to subsequent bookings, furthered along by the support of Sally Kirkland, a fashion editor at Vogue and Life magazines.

Through Kirkland, Hilliard was introduced to New York’s fashion elite. Designers such as Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta and Calvin Klein welcomed Hilliard and her camera into their studios and, more importantly, their shows.

Over time, she became a regular, albeit rare female member of the photographers’ pool. But as a woman as lithe as any model, she used her knowledge of how a dress was constructed — how it moved on the body and how the body moved with it — to capture the fashion in a uniquely informed way. Her pictures were different, more intuitively dynamic yet delightfully relatable, and a career was born. But the next great leap was yet to come.

An editor at a new magazine named Avenue noticed Hilliard’s work and engaged her as a freelancer — not for runway shows, but for parties.

The very same women who were traditionally seated in the front rows of the fashion shows that Hilliard had photographed by day would reappear in their designer gowns by night. She knew them, they knew her, and most importantly, they trusted her. It was the ultimate symbiotic relationship, further compounded by Nouvelle Society’s appetite for publicity — as one socialite after another would scan the room looking for her, knowing that Hilliard’s photos would show them at their very best.

“A long neck helps,” she laughs. But even those who weren’t the least bit swanlike still appeared elegant, svelte and youthful — and the clothes looked terrific.

This combination of well-bred manners and an antenna for beauty and fashion established Hilliard as a New York society insider, and ultimately one of the most sought-after photographers on the scene.

Along with the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Gala, her recurring coverage of the New York Public Library’s Library Lions awards and the American Ballet Theatre’s Spring Gala appeared regularly in the pages of Vogue, Town & Country, Women’s Wear Daily, and the New York Times Magazine, along with Avenue and Quest, magazines in which her work continues to appear.

While New York City solidly remains her home, she enjoys “too-few visits” to her cozy cottage in West Palm Beach’s Sunshine Park, and she still accepts the occasional booking, but only for longtime clients and friends.

“I always wished to be a fly on the wall, to watch but not participate,” she says. This reluctance to be noticed, along with her patrician Coconut Grove upbringing, is what has defined Mary Hilliard and her body of work.

It is indeed the ultimate irony that the majority of her subjects are some of the most noticed people in the world.Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/one-shoulder-prom-dresses-uk
[ 投稿者:makayla at 15:32 | Makayla Ashbolt | コメント(0) | トラックバック(0) ]